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Latest Updates on COVID-19 and Rare Neuroimmune Disorders

May 13 @ 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm EDT


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(During the podcast, you can interact with the moderator through the chat function in Zoom.)



About our Guest Speakers


Benjamin Greenberg, MD, MHS

Dr. Benjamin Greenberg received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Johns Hopkins University and his Masters Degree in Molecular Microbiology and Immunology from the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health in Baltimore, Maryland. He attended medical school at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. Then, he completed an internship in medicine at Rush-Presbyterian-St. Lukes Medical Center in Chicago, Illinois before going on to his residency in neurology at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, MD. He then joined the faculty within the division of neuroimmunology at Hopkins and became the co-director of the Transverse Myelitis Center and director of the Encephalitis Center. In January of 2009 he was recruited to the faculty at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center where he was named Director of the new Transverse Myelitis and Neuromyelitis Optica Program. That same year he founded the Pediatric Demyelinating Disease Program at Children’s Medical Center Dallas. Dr. Greenberg is recognized internationally as an expert in rare autoimmune disorders of the central nervous system (e.g. transverse myelitis, neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder, ADEM and autoimmune encephalitis). He splits his clinical time between seeing both adult and pediatric patients. He routinely consults on the inpatient units of University Hospital, Zale Lipshy, Parkland and Children’s. His research interests are in both the diagnosis and treatment of transverse myelitis, neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder, encephalitis, multiples sclerosis and infections of the nervous system. He is actively involved in developing better ways to diagnose and prognosticate for patients with these disorders. He has led an effort to improve biorepository development and has created uniform protocols for sample handling and analysis. As part of this initiative his research has identified novel biomarkers that may be able to distinguish between patients with various neurologic disorders. He also coordinates trials that study new treatments to prevent neurologic damage and restore function to those who have already been affected. He currently serves as the Director of the Neurosciences Clinical Research Center and is a Cain Denius Foundation Scholar.



Michael Levy, MD, PhD

Dr. Michael Levy is an Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School. He is the Director of the Neuromyelitis Optica Clinic and Research Laboratory, and Research Director in the Division of Neuroimmunology and Neuroinfectious Disease at Massachusetts General Hospital. Dr. Levy specializes in taking care of patients with neuroimmunologic diseases including multiple sclerosis, transverse myelitis, optic neuritis and neuromyelitis optica. In the laboratory, Dr. Levy’s research focus is on the development of neural stems for regenerative therapy in these diseases. He uses rat and mouse models to test the survival, differentiation and functional capacity of human neural stem cells to improve neurologic function in post-inflammatory conditions. The goal of his laboratory and clinical effort is to translate the basic science stem cell work to a human trial in transverse myelitis and other neuroimmunologic diseases.

SRNA Ask the Expert Podcast Series sponsored in part by  

* The Executive Committee of SRNA with the medical and scientific council determines the content and topics of the podcasts. Sponsors are not able to influence the education program.

Details

Date:
May 13
Time:
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm EDT
Event Category:

Venue

SRNA
United States

Organizer

SRNA
Phone:
+1 (855) 380-3330
Email:
info@wearesrna.org
Website:
wearesrna.org

Details

Date:
May 13
Time:
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm EDT
Event Category:

Venue

SRNA
United States

Organizer

SRNA
Phone:
+1 (855) 380-3330
Email:
info@wearesrna.org
Website:
wearesrna.org